An analysis of sex and death in renaissance florence

Some left to marry, some returned to their families and may also have married, some became domestic servants or workers in the textile industry, few became nuns, but 60 percent of the girls died while living there.

By Nicholas Terpstra Baltimore: When a simple and quick explanation was not readily available he launched a full-scale investigation. Sex and Death in Renaissance Florence. View freely available titles: Of the girls who entered between andthe average age was just over 12 years old.

Although a significant number of members came from the Florentine elite three Medici, four Antinori, six Ricasoli, seven Ridolfi, and eleven CapponiTerpstra notes that their names were recorded in an untraditional way. Garfagnini Florence,pp. But with this book he attains another level; here he engrosses and enter- tains while he edifies.

Although the Holy have carried off so many girls quite so soon, since la- See had declared neutrality in the War of the Spanish tency periods between second and third stage can last Succession, there was much political debate.

Since the 15th century silk had been a growth industry and by over 14, Florentines out of a population of about 70, were making silk; the percentages of the populations of Bologna and Venice were even higher. Of the girls to enter only left alive.

Yet they, too, continued to regard the girls as sexual property long after the House of Compassion had This content downloaded from By Sharon Strocchia Baltimore: Of the girls who lived there during the 14 years it was open, died there. By so doing, the friars brought down the mortality rate in the House of Compassion but completely This content downloaded from Of the girls who lived there during the 14 years it was open, died there.

You are not currently authenticated. The explications of individual siastical law about abortion or of the beneficent nature authors are valuable, but the structure is such that cer- of charitable institutions.

What was killing these girls.

An analysis of sex and death in renaissance florence

When a simple and quick explanation was not readily available he launched a full-scale investigation. When Nicholas Terpstra stumbled upon this information in the archive it appropriately piqued his curiosity.

Cohen Literary Review of Canada Read more May the s on. This book should be welcomed by anyone interested in social history, gender history, the history of sexuality, religious history or the history of medicine.

Those interested in the history of early-modern Catholic Europe and Catholic institutions on the Italian peninsula will find much to think about while reading this book.

In Lost Girls, though, there is no big reveal. In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: At the end of the chapter Modern and Early Modern came more concerned about the morality or the cor- descriptions at face value, Terpstra recognized the rectness of actions that seemed to abrogate rights.

The devout prayed to the saints to spare them an uncommon event. It focuses on one of the several conservatories that existed to care for them.

And they died for reasons that had everything to do with their age, gender, and vulnerability as lower-class girls who had been abandoned by their families.

Like the productions of the driven as older studies suggest. The reader also realises that information is often being withheld and released at particular points in the story. Many of the members were widows and most of the pledges were for small amounts, less than 2 lire.

The Roman people, he argued, a growing body of scholarship that challenges long-held transferred to emperors only ordinary power, not the historical assumptions about female honor in the Med- power to void established rights. When Nicholas Terpstra stumbled upon this information in the archive it appropriately piqued his curiosity.

Terpstra attempts to solve this mystery. Lacking more direct evidence he devotes successive chapters to the context: It is appropriate for a non-scholarly audience as it is both entertaining and informative.

He also spun a great story and wove it into an extremely astute and nuanced examination of the sexual culture of Renaissance Florence. There were fewer places for the most vulnerable girls and more for the illegitimate daughters of courtiers, clerics, and civil servants.

Using his own understanding of the Florentine landscape based on his years as a scholar, a myriad of highly suggestive literary works, and some of the quality scholarship produced by other fine Renaissance scholars, Terpstra solved his mystery to my satisfaction, anyway and painted a wonderfully detailed and eye-catching portrait of the sexual landscape in Renaissance Florence that illuminates just how perilous life could have been for young women.

Lost Girls: Sex and Death in Renaissance Florence

Giovanni and Lusanna: Love and Marriage in Renaissance Florence Summary SuperSummary, a modern alternative to SparkNotes and CliffsNotes, offers high-quality study guides that feature detailed chapter summaries and analysis of major themes, characters, quotes, and essay topics.

Lost Girls: Sex and Death in Renaissance Florence. By Nicholas Terpstra (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, xiii plus pp.). In late a group of female philanthropists opened a shelter for abandoned girls, the Casa della Pietà, in a rundown building in an unsavory neighborhood in Florence.

Ina group of idealistic laywomen founded a home for homeless and orphaned adolescent girls in one of the worst neighborhoods in Florence. Of the girls who lived in the home during its fourteen-year tenure, only left there alive. Lost Girls: Sex and Death in Renaissance Florence.

By Nicholas Terpstra. (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. Pp.

Lost girls : sex and death in Renaissance Florence

xviii, $ ISBN ) This unusual and ingenious academic book, written in the manner of a detective story, has a great many advantages, but the snag. Through the lens of the Pietà we learn about the birth and death of girls in Renaissance Florence, medical practices and disease, the political economy of marriage, gender relations, the lives of.

Lost Girls: Sex and Death in Renaissance Florence. By Nicholas Terpstra (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, xiii plus pp.).

By Nicholas Terpstra (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, xiii plus pp.).

Lost Girls An analysis of sex and death in renaissance florence
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Lost Girls: Sex and Death in Renaissance Florence | Department of History